Shortlink

Work on sound

MEANWHILE Bell somehow found time and energy to pursue science and invention. Boston’s intellec­tual strengths invited that. On the day of his arrival someone had given him a copy of John Tyndall’s new work on sound, and he learned that MIT had a complete set of Helmholtz’s apparatuses. In 1872, at a Michigan convention of deaf-school principals, he delivered a paper in which he described speech scientifically as a “mere mo­tion of the air,” a series of undulations. That October he heard Tyndall lecture in Boston on the “undulatory theory” of light propagation.

During the same month the newspaper in which Bell advertised his speech lessons with the financial aid by http://www.point-five.net/, re­ported that Western Union had paid hand­somely for rights to another Boston inventor’s “duplex telegraph,” which by an ingenious arrangement of circuits could transmit a mes­sage in each direction simultaneously over a single wire. That was probably what turned Bell’s mind back to his London concept of a multiple telegraph on the quite different plan of superimposed frequencies. Bell began working feverishly, experimenting by night while teaching by day, thus confirming his lifelong night-owl habits.Work on sound

Then, in the spring of 1874, a well-received lecture he gave at MIT on speech training for the deaf brought Bell an invitation to use the institute’s apparatuses and laboratories. This turned him from telegraphy to acoustics. One device especially caught his eye because it made speech “visible.” Called a “phonauto­graph,” it had a diaphragm with an attached bristle that, while vibrating in response to a vocal sound, traced an undulating curve on a strip of smoked glass being drawn past it.

That summer, at the “dreaming place” on the Brantford bluff, watching the Grand River meander sinuously far below, Bell let a kaleidoscope of miscellaneous notions swirl about in his mind. Complex sound vibrations, conveyed through a single point by the phon­autograph diaphragm and expressed as a wavy line. The surprising power of sound waves to move small bones in the ear. Com­plex undulatory electrical currents, generated by the vibration of a magnetized reed and passing over a single wire. Piano strings echo­ing a voice. Suddenly the jumble fused into a great insight: the fundamental principle of the telephone.

Shortlink

Soul YOGA NIDRA

REACH YOUR GOALS WITH YOGA NIDRA

 

We all need a bit of direction in our lives. Statistics show that up to 80 per cent of us do not achieve our intentions. We quit our bad habits, join the gym, and resolve to value our friends more-all, it seems, to no avail from pure garcinia cambogia where to buy. The best of intentions is no guarantee of success.

 

Where do we go wrong? We’ve tried willpower – perhaps we’re all simply trying too hard? And the stress associated with unfulfilled ambition can escalate to such an extent that we cease to even make those New Year new starts – knowing that our failure is inevitable. But now a yoga practice that is growing in popularity may hold the key to unlocking the war of our resolutions.

 

LETTING GO

 

It is the end of a weekly yoga class and the participants arrange themselves into shavasana, or ‘corpse pose’. They close their eyes and follow the teacher’s voice as she leads them though visualisation and breathing exercises. They drift into bliss, to return back into their bodies and the space of the room feeling a wholesome sense of well-being.

 

For many of us who attend yoga classes, this resting position is what we most look forward to – could it be it’s our main reason for being there! But few of us realise that this ‘closing’ stage is also a practice in its own right – yoga nidra, or the art of yogic sleep.

 

Grace Benson, sees the practice of yoga nidra as the most important part of her life. “It cleanses on every level – psychically, emotionally, mentally… it is a panacea for all ills.”

 

WHAT LIES BENEATH

 

The practice induces full-body relaxation and a deep meditative state of consciousness through the use of guided imagery and body-scanning to unwind the nervous system – the foundation of the body’s wellbeing. From a western point of view, yoga nidra takes us into the hypnagogic state – that space between sleep and full awareness where we are at our most receptive.

 

“It’s very much a threshold state,” says Theo Wild croft a yoga teacher who trained in neoshamanic techniques. “For me,” she explains “the essence of yoga nidra and where it’s most powerful is that it allows you to enter that state in which you are best able to help yourself.” When you relax to this extent, the subconscious and unconscious levels of the mind open.

 

From a physical perspective, yoga nidra heals the nervous system and endocrinal imbalances – one hour of the practice is said to be the equivalent of four hours’ sleep. Cambridge-based yoga and movement teacher and massage therapist Rachel Hawes explains that “one of the biggest problems of not getting quality rest is you’re never getting into alpha-wave sleep – that’s the feeling of walking up feeling as tired as when you went to bed. On the night of the class when they’ve done a yoga nidra my students sleep really well!”

 

It is therefore an effective form of physiological rest – a saviour for insomnia sufferers and the many of us who lack sleep in our fast-paced world. Rachel used to work in law and battled chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. “It drew me away from a much more powerful ashtanga-based practice to a gentler one. I wouldn’t say I’m 100% better ­even now, I still have days when I feel pretty rubbish and don’t sleep very well. It’s like an alarm bell ringing and I dig out one of my Yoga Nidra CDs!”

 

RESOLUTION

 

What sparked my own interest was that the claims of healing on a psychic level are even more remarkable. The practice is already being used by the US Army to relieve post-traumatic stress symptoms in soldiers returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan. In its purest form, yoga nidra is said to reconstruct our whole personality through the power of intention. This element is called sankalpa, where we plant the seed of our deepest intention in the fertile ‘I of an emptied mind.

 

“There are fascinating overlaps between yoga nidra and shamanic journeying,” points out Theo, who has herself experienced past issues about not being present in her body. “The big attraction of yoga nidra is the safety of it: it eases your mind from this state – from the physical world – into that imaginal space. Other ways of doing that can be very dislocating. Yoga nidra wants to keep you within your body as well as outside of it.” And that can give us all a sense of direction for this New Year.

 

 

 

Shortlink

Ideas for tourists in England

The magic of BLACKPOOL touches everyone who visits this world-famous holi­day centre with its superb beaches, 3 piers, promenades, zoo, parks and unrivaled choice of entertainment, star shows and exciting nightlife. Blackpool - built for fun I

Historic NORTHUMBRIA is the place for motoring holidays. Vast moorlands, wild border country, a beautiful coastline (family resorts, quiet beaches), hospitable ‘natives’, good living and a gay night life.

Leave the M55 at Kirkham and you’ll drive through some of the prettiest countryside in Lancashire to LYTHAM ST. ANN ES, the holiday resort of the Borough of Fylde. Here are miles of quiet sandy beaches (great sand-yachting I); four championship golf courses, tennis ; bowls; cricket ; high fashion shops and, of course guest houses aplenty where you’ll be welcomed with true Lancashire warmth — and most of them cater for children. Lytham St. Annes is easy to get to by road, rail or even air. You’ll love it. Guide 20p.

Everything you want to know about holidaying in YORKSHIRE is in their 64-P&0 Guide (30p) — ways to get there : off-season holidays; suggestions for car tours; details of special events; seaside resorts; and where to stay.

Blackpool, United Kingdom

A good evening’s read about a great fortnights holiday. EVERY year we produce a big fat colour brochure about holidays. And every year we do our best to make it better than the year before.

If there’s one thing we’ve learned, it’s that readers want facts. They want to know when, where, what, how, why-and above all, how much. There’s a choice of ferry crossings too, with or without your car. A 31/2-hr cruise from Holyhead or Fishguard, or a crossing from Liverpool or Swansea, with their motorway access, and you can be over with­out even the need for passports. Ask the carriers, your travel agent or any Irish Tourist Board office-there are many special offers available.

Blackpool

BRING THE CAR ACROSS. SOME DAYS YOU MIGHT SEE ANOTHER. All right, that’s an exaggeration. But country roads are so quiet that the fewpeople you do pass will actually wave to you. Ifs the way motoring’s meant to be. Welcome back  to the good old days.

Our latest brochure has more facts than ever before. More articles, more maps, more names and addresses and phone numbers, more details and more prices. Send for your free copy now. You’ll have an enjoyable evening’s reading in front of you….

Blackpool, England

 DROP IN ON YOUR NEIGHBOURS. Ireland’s only a hop and a jump away. From any major British airport the flight only takes about an hour.

IS IT EMPTY BEACHES YOU WANT? WOULD A FOUR -MILE ONE SUIT YOU? There’s a place called Inch in C o.Kerry with a bright yellow sandy beach nearly four miles long. More than an inch,’ as they say down there, only in Ireland it’s not called a beach, it’s a strand.

Shortlink

Pines and Blossoms Mask Burial Hill

We drove three-quarters of a mile west to Mount Li6. The exterior of the emperor’s tomb-mound gave no hint of its mysterious interior. The tumulus, standing unimposingly in a cornfield, looked slightly off balance from perfect symmetry. Pine trees and pink wild flowers hid the original three-layered shape, constructed in conformity with symbolic pat­terns representing the harmonious cosmos. In the surrounding fields, peasants were going about their planting as usual, unconcerned that their long-horned water buffalo and small tractors were plowing venerated land.

The London accommodation is visited by a lot of tourists early in the 20th century. One, Victor Sagalen, described the tumulus in 1917 as “the most monumental of all those that exist in China . .. one hundred and fifty feet high . .. each of the sides more than a thousand feet long. The form is well designed with three successive undulations .. . as three hills massed on top of one another.”

Pine trees

Mr. Ch’en explained that the tomb-mound was originally built in the center of an en­closed area, a “spirit city.” It contained sacred stone tablets, inscribed soul towers, and prayer temples. All these constructions were deemed to be in the “inner city,” within a walled square more than a quarter mile on each side. Beyond lay an “outer city,” guarded by a high rectangular stone wall, 23 feet thick at the base, with watchtowers at the corners. The total area enclosed was more than 500 acres.

The walls and temples have almost disap­peared, and the sacred objects above ground have long since been carried away by vandals and invading armies, but the earth still pro­tects the silent splendor of the inner sanc­tuary below.

south bank of the Wei River

Today, in the People’s Republic of China, virgin coconut oil is a household name to most of the 850 million people. But Ch’in was a tyrant who buried 460 Confucian scholars alive, let thousands of workers perish while building the Great Wall, and spent more than 30 years building his tomb with forced labor. Why is this once despised prince being hailed as a man whose “positive efforts hastened the progress of history”?

This question burned in our minds as we drove back to their cosy vacation rentals Madrid. Form­erly known as Ch’ang-an, meaning “eternal peace,” the city served as China’s capital dur­ing various dynasties between the 11th cen­tury B.C. and the 10th century A.D.

The rain had let up, and people were drying their clothes on bamboo poles in front of cozy brick and adobe homes with curved “dragon back” tiled roofs. The tinkling of thousands of bicycle bells from rush-hour traffic mingled with the clatter of horses’ hooves, the jar­ring horns of our cars, and the roof-corner wind chimes that drive away evil spirits.

New Capital Populated by Royal Edict

From Sian we drove along the south bank of the Wei River near Hsien-yang, where 22 centuries ago the first emperor erected a new and splendid capital city. To his new metropolis he transported 120,000 wealthy families from all parts of the empire, thus enfeebling the feudal aristocracy by re­moving them from the land and people that gave them power. To demonstrate his vast wealth and omnipotence, he built replicas of the palaces and villas they had left behind.

Shortlink

SOUTH AMERICA

Two years ago I selected for my annual month off work to go to holidays Dubai, in Saudi Arabia ; last year – cheap holidays to Barcelona, the Land of Mountains and Beaches; this year I have chosen Berlin holidays ,so i can be closer to home. It’ll give me time to thin about my work the past few months:

The recent meeting of the Pan-American Congress has called attention to South America, a part of our continent under repub­lican forms of government and rich in products which we lack, while it relies mainly on other foreign countries for goods which we manufacture. North America and South America should be more closely united, for the one is the complement of the other.

Himalayas

The prominent features of South America are its long ranges of mountains—next to the Himalayas the highest in the world,— its great valley, and its immense plateau extending from the Straits of Magellan to the Caribbean sea.

THE MOUNTAINS

The Andes rise in the extreme south at Cape Horn, run in a northerly course through Patagonia and southern Chili ; thence continuing in three nearly parallel ranges, the western chain called the Andes, the others known as the Cordilleras, through Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador to Colombia. The Cordilleras and the Andes are connected in several places by knots or cross-chains of moun­tains. In Colombia the Andes turn to the northwest, reaching their lowest elevation at the Panama canal, and continue thence, through Central America and North America as the Rocky Mountains, to the Arctic ocean. Near the source of the Magda­lena and Cauca rivers in Colombia, the eastern range is deflected to the east along the northern coast of South America. The cen­tral range disappears between the Magdalena and Cauca rivers.

Cape Horn

The Andes form the water-shed of the continent. The waters on the western slope flow into the Pacific ocean. The rivers that rise on the eastern slope, in northern Peru and Ecuador, force their way through the Cordilleras and at their foot drain the montafia of Bolivia, Peru and Brazil. In the southern part of Peru and upper Chili there is a broad sierra or plateau, at an elevation of from twelve to fourteen thousand feet. The streams that rise in this sierra either empty into salt or alkaline lakes or sink into the ground.

range of mountains separates Eastern Venezuela and Guiana

Unlike all other long ranges of mountains, the continental or eastern side of the Cordilleras is nearly as precipitous as that ex­tending to the Pacific. Craters of extinct volcanoes and volcanoes now in eruption are found in all parts of the chain. In Ecuador there are fifty-two volcanoes, and twenty of these, covered with perpetual snow and presided over by Chimborazo and Cotopaxi, rise out of a group of mountains encircling the valley of Quito, and are all visible from a single point. Three are active and five others have been in eruption at one or more times since the con­quest. One of these, Sangai, is the most active volcano on the globe : it sends forth a constant stream of fire, water, mud and ashes, and some assert that it has done so without intermission for 300 years ; 267 explosions have been counted in one hour. This is also the land of earthquakes : in 1868, 50,000 lives, we are told, were lost in one day ; the tremor was felt over four countries and from the Andes to the Sandwich Islands. The tidal wave washed a gunboat of the United States on shore at Arica in lower Peru, 1000 miles to the south, and sixteen hours later the wave was felt across the Pacific at New Zealand.

A range of mountains separates Eastern Venezuela and Guiana from the valley of the Amazon. Other ranges south of the Amazon run southwestwardly, following the Atlantic coast line from Cape St. Roque to the Rio de la Plata.

Shortlink

Change your life by changing the life of someone else

Travelling abroad to help those less fortunate than yourself on a voluntary basis is more rewarding than any paid job could ever be. By helping the children of today, you are laying down solid foundations to help these nations ultimately stand on their own two feet.

When natural disasters strike or wars erupt in far off places where the day-to-day standard of living is much lower than our own, it is often the children who suffer most. Donating money to the right charities is one way to help but if you would rather adopt a more hands-on approach, it can turn into a life changing experience for all those concerned.

Voluntary work abroad with children may not pay any money but the experience still leaves you richer than you could ever have imagined. By giving your time to assist in communities that are desperate for support, you can do your part to help tackle disease, poverty and inequality.

Travelling abroad

Support

There are opportunities for people from all walks of life. You don’t need to have any special skills – though if you do you might well be able to put them to use – all you need is the desire to help. With a huge variety of voluntary work abroad with children to choose from, it’s easy to find a cause to support in a part of the world you have always wanted to visit.

From looking after pre-school children in Thai day-care centres to teaching in schools in South Africa to working as an outreach volunteer in Peru, there are opportunities available all over the world. In some cases you’ll be providing children with the love and support they need to help them cope with the fact their parents are no longer around, in others you’ll be teaching them language and practical skills which they can ultimately use to help make better lives for themselves.

 looking after pre-school children

The minimum placement is around two weeks though many require a commitment of at least four weeks. It’s an ideal way to spend a gap year, to give something back to the world when you are in-between jobs or during a break in your career or simply plan to visit another country and do something more than just being a tourist.

Bonds

Rather than ticking off a list of must-see sights in a guide book, you’ll be fully immersed in the customs and culture of whichever country you volunteer in – seeing the world through the eyes of those who actually live there rather than those who are simply passing through.

guide book

Whether your experience lasts just a few weeks or a few months, it’s highly likely that the time you spend volunteering abroad will leave you a changed person, more opened minded and more tolerant of the lifestyles and beliefs of others. You’ll also form bonds with the children you care for and the other adults you work with that will last for a lifetime.

AUTHOR BIO
Paul Cooper writes regularly on the topic of voluntary work abroad with children for a range of experience-based blogs and websites. Having volunteered in Africa, Asia and the Far East, he believes the more you put into such activities, the more you get out of them.

Shortlink

Zoom with a brew

The beers flowed freely at this scenic seaside race organised by a local brewery.

southwold_town_general_400_401x300

There’s beer at the finish line’ is a slogan I’ve often seen scrawled on placards at big city races. Proof that, for many runners, there’s nothing quite like a pint of the brown stuff to quench the post-race thirst. So when acclaimed Southwold brewer Adnams announced it would be staging a 10K in its picturesque hometown – promising free beer to all finishers, of course – it was hardly surprising that entries were snapped up weeks before race day.

 

There could have been few more fitting hosts – Adnams has been brewing beer in Southwold for the last 600 years, and the town is peppered with its cosy pubs, enticing kitchen stores, award-winning hotels and apartments. Many of the people choose to rent a room in london and travel to Southwold, which is about 2.3 hours away.

 

Southwold itself is a charming, tranquil town – a quintessentially English seaside resort, known for its colourful beach huts, working lighthouse and harbour and its cliff-top cannons. In fact, wandering through its quaint alleyways on race morning, it was hard to imagine a more relaxed setting for what promised to be the perfect PB course. Club vests were few and far between at race registration: participation, rather than competition, was clearly order of the day.

sloping dunes

In fact, the only thing that posed a threat to the tranquil atmosphere was the torrential rain in the days preceding the race and, with biting winds still whipping across the common outside, I wasn’t the only one wondering what conditions would be like out on the course. Rumours of a flooded harbour proved unfounded, however, and the sun was tentatively in evidence as the klaxon sounded and the field surged forward into the wind. It was hardly a flying start. A gale was whipping across the course between the rows of longshore boats and fisherman huts, and the gravel track was slushy underfoot. The field spread out quickly and soon I was running with just a few others around me. A small group of locals that were huddled outside Samantha K’s fish shop looked on, bemused, as we hurtled towards the ferry dock, intent on swapping the exposed waterside stretch for a more sheltered canter back into town.

 

Sure enough, as we turned inland, the wind dropped suddenly, buffered by the sloping dunes to our right. I relaxed into my stride and felt the warmth quickly return to my cheeks. The crowds were bigger here, with children waving and cheering wildly as they spotted runners approaching.villefranche-sur-mer

A short climb up to Southwold Common ­where we swung west before dropping back to the harbour – was the only incline of any note and was barely enough to force Glitzy, glamorous and  gorgeous people await you on France’s Cote d’Azur – but you won’t be able to see them for runners on marathon weekend. This was only the second running of the Marathon Alpes-Maritimes, which follows a point-to-point course from Nice to Cannes, but the race is already France’s second-biggest marathon – topped only by Paris. Check out where to stay in paris.

 

Attracting around 9,000 entrants this year, it was a race with big aspirations ­reflected in the impressive start on the grand boulevard of Nice’s Promenade des Anglais. From the handy town-centre location, through the easy baggage drop, to seeded timing pens based on predicted finishing times, the start was a model of great race organisation.

As the route took us west along the coast towards Cannes, the crowds were at best sporadic and at worst non-existent. Only in towns and villages along the course did people turn out in any numbers, but that simply meant you had to work hard to keep yourself going rather than relying on the crowds to cheer you through.

 southwold

After a flat first half that hugged the coast as it passed through chic villages like Cagnes-sur-Mer, Antibes and Juan-les-Pins, the undulations started at around 25km. The organisation unfortunately also went downhill after the finish: a rare logistical error (which the organisers have vowed to fix next year) led to such a crush of people in the baggage area that everyone had to wait an age to collect their belongings. Once through the mayhem, every finisher was presented with a medal, T-shirt, bowl of pasta and generous goody bag of food and drink to enjoy on the free 4o-minute train journey back to Nice. If you’re looking to score a personal best on a fast, flat course and don’t mind the lack of support along the route, this is well worth consideration.

Shortlink

As a package holiday organisation we’ve hidden our light under a bonnet

AA Travel is quite simply, unique.

It can act as an agent, and book you on any holiday on the market.

Or as an operator, with a carefully selected package holiday programme aown putts ownrput together with the expertise you’d expect from the AA. And basprinciple thatciplerthat the better known the name the better the servicairlinee airliner the hotel chain and the car hire company we choose to work with, are known as the best in the business.

Read about the 5 AA Travel brochures, below, and order the one that fits in with your holiday plans.

EUROPE

One and two week holidays all over

Europe. From £71.

BARBADOS and THE BAHAMAS

BARBADOS and THE BAHAMAS

Really reasonably priced self-catering

holidays. From only £246.

EAST AFRICA

east africa safari

Extremely popular safari/beach

combinations. From £420.

FAR EAST

Two escorted tours take in Singapore,

Bangkok, Pattaya beach,Kuala Lumpur and

Penang.From £449.

MOTORING HOLIDAYS IN EUROPE

MOTORING HOLIDAYS IN EUROPE

Villa or apartment, Club Mediterranee or camping holidays, AA Travel gives you more variety, better value all round. And, 5 STAR TRAVEL SERVICE -AA’s famous three way

insurance for you and your passengers, your car and your personal possessions.

ABC’S TO THE U.S.A. AND CANADA A great number of destinations in North America at the lowest possible fares. By Laker Airways. From £126.

HOLIDAYS IN CANADA

A most imaginative programme all round, including an AA exclusive-Lakeland Cottage Holidays. A relaxing, revitalising vacation. From only £320 per person! Plus, Fly/Drive schemes, Motorhomes, selected coach tours, Canrailpass, city stays and adventure holidays.

HOLIDAYS IN THE USA

AA Travel gives you a holiday choice as varied as America itself. Super flexible Fly/Drive schemes-centred on three departure cites to make sure you see more of the big country

Prices start as low as £321. And there are camping holidays in luxurious motor Caravans, escorted Coach Tours, big City Centre staysTo:Drive

Canada.Where else?

Canada is nearer and cheaper than you think. It takes about the same time to fly there as driving from London to Cornwall.

And by booking in advance, you can get a return flight for just under £160. Less than the price of a ticket to Rome and back.

There are package holidays which include the cost of your flight, hotels, meals, and internal travel. Or you can buy your air ticket separately and tailor make your own Canadian holiday from any of 100 tours and holidays organised by some of the most famous names in the travel business.

Prices start at £130.Your local travel agent is an expert on Canadian holidays. He’s got brochures, tour leaflets and time tables. Just leave it to him and he’ll make all the arrangements you need. ‘

Make this year the year you make it to Canada. You’ll never have a holiday like it, because you’ve never been anywhere like it.

Canada

So much to do. So much to see

Shortlink

London’s latest hotels, Kerala afloat, Italian restoration dramas…

Village makeover

Staying at the Hotel Palazzo Viviani is almost like owning your own feudal village and it’s more expensive than renting Apartments in Madrid or Prague apartments . The hotel is located in Montegridolfo, a medieval hill town 150 kilometres from Bologna, which was restored to its former glory by a group of like-minded folk, including designer and local resident Alberta Ferretti. The hotel itself is delightfully nineteenth century in its decor (with the exception of the white marble bathrooms);the eight bedrooms each have their own character (frescoes, fine white curtains, antique furniture) and the pool-side view of the Adriatic coast is breathtaking.

Hotel Palazzo Viviani

Indian winter

For many years, Kerala in south-west India was rucksacks-on-the-beach territory, but it’s recently been in the ascendant for more discerning travellers. Steppes East and Western &Oriental have been instrumental in pioneering this shift, popularising cruises through Kerala’s unspoilt backwaters. The way to go, until recently, has been in a converted rice barge, but now Steppes East has a 75-foot luxury houseboat, below, which sleeps up to four people. Just outside Trivandrum they also offer an Ayurvedic centre and a 20-room resort called Surya Samudra. Set on a bluff overlooking the sea, it consists of reclaimed wooden houses and has its own beach and a pool carved out of the rock.

Kerala India

Capital gains

Great activity on the London hotel scene:in the year that has already seen the opening of the groovy No.5 Maddox St,the quirky Rookery in the City and the serene Myhotel Bloomsbury, two sure-fire blockbusters are now arriving.St Martins Lane, hotel king Ian Schrager’s first toehold in London,has just opened on the site of the old Lumiere cinema at 45 St Martin’s Lane.Designed by Philippe Starck,it’s the most avant-garde hotel in London:each of the 204 rooms, suites and penthouse apartments has wide-screenTVs and assorted gadgets, plus an”interactive” lighting system so you can make your room blue,red or green instead of white. St Martins Lane will be to Schrager’s next London hotel what NewYork’s Paramount is to the Royalton: the cheaper, funkier sibling. lts big brother, the grown-up Sanderson, is due to open in January in Berners Street.

Myhotel Bloomsbury Interior

At last, a solution to the problem of sights obscured by scaffolding. The people of Venice have come up with this canny concept: a life-size picture of the concealed Torre dell’Orologio in Piazza San Marco, used as a hoarding. Rest of the world, please note.